Archive for the ‘Sales’ category

Apply Interpersonal Intelligence To The Sales Approach

September 30, 2016

In his controversial book, Frames of Mind – The Theory Of Multiple Intelligences, Howard Gardner introduces the theory of seven different intelligences: linguistic, musical, logical, spatial, kinesthetic, intrapersonal, and interpersonal.  Gardner defines interpersonal intelligence as: the ability to read the intentions and desires of other individuals and act upon this knowledge (Frames of Mind p. 239).

It is interesting to understand how leaders and their sales staff apply interpersonal intelligence to the selling process.  Behavioral tools and structures should be used to allow sales associates to better understand themselves, read their customers, and adapt to their customers.  Applying behavioral science to the sales process creates a greater connection between the buyer and seller and leads to more sales.

Leaders should sharpen the interpersonal intelligence of their sales staff and empower them for greater success.

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Words of Wisdom From Bill Marriott

March 10, 2014

Bill Marriott joined the family business in 1956, became president in 1964, and CEO in 1972.  Today he serves as chairman of the board and writes about his management style and company events on his blog Marriott on the Move.  He helped build Marriott International to more than 20 brands and 3,900 properties in 72 countries employing more than 325,000 people around the world.

In 1964, Bill Marriott developed his 12 rules for success that are as relevant as ever today.

  1. Challenge your team to do better and do it often.
  2. Take good care of your associates, they’ll take good care of your customers, and the customers will come back.
  3. Celebrate your peoples’ success, not your own.
  4. Know what you’re good at and keep improving.
  5. Do it and do it now. Err on the side of taking action.
  6. Communicate by listening to your customers, associates and competitors.
  7. See and be seen. Get out of your office, walk the talk, make yourself visible and accessible.
  8. Success is always in the details.
  9. It’s more important to hire people with the right qualities than with specific experience.
  10. Customer needs may vary, but their bias for quality never does.
  11. Always hire people who are smarter than you are.
  12. View every problem as an opportunity to grow.

Empower your leaders to follow Bill Marriott’s advice and you’ll be more successful.

Source: Samantha Shankman

Apply Interpersonal Intelligence To Your Sales Approach

December 3, 2010

In his controversial book, Frames of Mind – The Theory Of Multiple Intelligences, Howard Gardner introduces the theory of seven different intelligences: linguistic, musical, logical, spatial, kinesthetic, intrapersonal, and interpersonal.  Gardner defines interpersonal intelligence as: the ability to read the intentions and desires of other individuals and act upon this knowledge*.

How do you or your sales staff apply interpersonal intelligence to your selling process?  We recommend using behavioral tools and structures to allow sales associates to better understand themselves, read their customers, and adapt to their customers.  Applying behavioral science to the sales process creates a greater connection between the buyer and seller and leads to more sales.

Sharpen the interpersonal intelligence of your sales staff and empower them for greater success.

* (Frames of Mind p. 239)

Opposites Don’t Attract

September 12, 2010

Have you ever heard the phrase opposites attract? It’s wrong. It makes sense to us but it’s still wrong. The data on relationships are completely convincing – people who are like one another tend to be attracted to one another.

The problem with this “opposites attract” mentality is that leaders are naturally attracted to hiring people who are like them. And, if they only hire people like them, they will end up with a team of people who have all of their strengths, and all of their weaknesses.

What’s the danger in that? If you make a mistake, the other people like you on your team are less likely to catch it. In fact they’re likely to not even notice it is a mistake.

The best way for leaders to solve this problem is to benchmark their jobs and determine the specific profile to be successful in the job and then hire against that profile.  This unbiased, objective job matching approach reduces the chance a leader may hire against their own personality profile.

If very early on in the selection process, you’re “totally in love with” a candidate, we’d suspect that they’re just like you. They may work out fine, or they may be adding to your weaknesses in a way that you don’t expect.

Add empowering behavioral tools to your selection process for future success.

Source: manager-tools.com

Conversation Tips When Communicating To A Dominating Personality Style

March 8, 2010

Whether it is intended or not, most people when in buying or customer mode take on the characteristics of a “dominating” personality style.  It’s a natural defensive posture we all assume when we are concerned someone may take advantage of us.

The best way to present to these buyers/customers when they are in that mode is to be direct and to the point.  Don’t waste time with unnecessary small talk and overwhelming facts and figures.  Get directly to the bottom line.  Use the BLUF (Bottom Line Up Front) model when communicating.  Keep the conversation concise, focused, and on the immediate topic.  They will be impressed with an efficient, no-nonsense, business-like manner.

Remember, Peter Drucker’s advice, “Communication is what the listener does.”  Customize your delivery to the style of the listener and empower yourself for successful conversations.

Consider The Needs And Style Of People You’re Addressing

February 24, 2010

Whether you are a leader providing feedback to a direct report or a sales person addressing a prospect or client, think about the style and communication needs of the receiver of your communication.  People have very different needs and preferences in the way they process communication, and in their natural style of delivering it.

As an example, a gregarious extrovert wanting to spend time bonding by talking about the Olympics or last weeks’ current events, may frustrate a strong-willed task-focused individual who just wants to get down to business.

Too often we get caught up in the message we want to deliver and fail to recognize the needs of the receiver. As a result, we communicate in the way we would want to have someone speak to us when so often those very attributes can turn off a listener with a different style.

Helping your direct reports explore their own behavior style and recognizing the behavior style of others will allow them much greater successes in their interpersonal communication and relationships, as well.

Empower your direct reports to develop their Interpersonal Intelligence and watch the effectiveness of their communication improve.