Archive for October 2017

Through Preparation, Then Through Trust

October 13, 2017

One sign of a controlling leader is they become ineffective when they or their cohorts are not around to use external controls.  It’s not uncommon to hear a leader say, “I can’t go on a two week vacation, the place will fall apart if I’m gone that long.”

Going away for two weeks is a perfect way to test for empowerment; however, leaders cannot just dump and run.  Here are some actions leaders can take to ensure they and their direct reports feel confident while they are gone:

  • Document the critical aspects of the leader’s position;
  • Identify direct reports who are capable of these aspects (they need not all be carried out by the same person);
  • Train and/or cross-train;
  • Have a direct report do the aspect of the work as a trial run before leaving;
  • Finally, enjoy the time away.

By empowering direct reports to perform aspects of the leader’s job while they’re gone and entrusting them to make decisions in their absence, direct reports will successfully increase trust, confidence, engagement, and productivity.  Leaders may even find that allowing the direct report to continue that work upon their return opens new options up for them.

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Direct Reports Should Be Challenged To Continuously Develop

October 6, 2017

In his book “The Shallows: What The Internet Is Doing To Our Brains”, Nicholas Carr argues that our reliance on the Internet is changing how our brains operate.  As we become more reliant on the Internet, and electronics in general, our brains are required to do less memorization and deep reading.  With facts and data being just a few keystrokes away, why tax our brains with memorization?  Why read a complete article or book, when with a few clicks several summaries and reviews give us what we need to know?

The Internet has made things much easier for our brains.  But the brain is like any other muscle and needs to be exercised or will atrophy.  Leaders must ask themselves how they are challenging their direct reports to exercise their brains.

One leader asked each of his direct reports to read the first chapter of a popular personal development book and send him a brief review of what they read and how their executive team could be more effective.  The direct reports enjoyed the exercise, the leader enjoyed the improvements, and the team became stronger.

Leaders who empower their direct reports to develop their brains will enjoy success too.