Archive for February 2012

Set Borders And Boundaries To Avoid Inappropriate Workplace Attire?

February 23, 2012

If the fashion magazines are correct, this year is going to present many challenges for leaders.  Among the most concerning fashion movements is wearing “sheer” in the office.  Yes, see-through office wear seems to be the upcoming fad.  How are you going to deal with this?

Hopefully you’ve been conducting regular feedback sessions with your direct reports and the communication lines are in place.  This will make relating work rules and having difficult conversations much easier.  You’ll want to make sure you have established the borders and boundaries for office attire before the summer season arrives.
 
During an upcoming feedback session or team meeting you can simply say, “I just wanted to make sure everyone understands with the warmer months coming, we will all want to dress a little lighter.  Though we respect your choices and individuality, we still expect you to be dressed professionally.  Unreasonably short or see-through clothing is not professional.  Please consider our culture, your co-workers, and customers when choosing what you wear to work.”
 
Set attire borders and boundaries and empower your direct reports to make the proper choices on work wear and you’ll both be more successful.
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Tip: Share A New Hire’s Assessment Results With Them

February 16, 2012
 
Hopefully you are using assessments in your selection process to help make better hires.  Unfortunately, once the hiring decision is made, the assessment results are never used again.  New hire assessment results can provide valuable insight during the on-boarding process.
 
Shortly after hiring a candidate, share with them their assessment report.  Most new hires are curious about their results; take this opportunity to use the results to help the new hire get a faster start in the job.  Highlight what you liked about the results and encourage the new hire to continue to use those strengths in their new role.  Also, indicate areas of concern found in the assessments and inspire the new hire to focus there in their personal development.
 
Additionally, make sure the new hire’s manager(s) also receives and understands the assessment results.  Assessments are a valuable leadership tool and can help managers understand where they might need to lend assistance and where they need to get out of the way.
 
Empower new hires and their managers with the selection assessment results and you increase the performance of your newly hired asset.

No Need To Share A Candidate’s Assessment Results With Them

February 9, 2012
 
Hopefully you are using assessments in your selection process to help make better hires.  Unfortunately, once the hiring decision is made, the assessment results are never used again.  New hire assessment results can provide valuable insight during the on-boarding process.
 
Shortly after hiring a candidate, share with them their assessment report.  Most new hires are curious about their results; take this opportunity to use the results to help the new hire get a faster start in the job.  Highlight what you liked about the results and encourage the new hire to continue to use those strengths in their new role.  Also, indicate areas of concern found in the assessments and inspire the new hire to focus there in their personal development.
 
Additionally, make sure the new hire’s manager(s) also receives and understands the assessment results.  Assessments are a valuable leadership tool and can help managers understand where they might need to lend assistance and where they need to get out of the way.
 
Empower new hires and their managers with the selection assessment results and you increase the performance of your newly hired asset.

Lead Your Direct Reports Differently

February 2, 2012

If you have more then one child, you know how different they are.  In sports, most of the great coaches are successful because they know each of their players require a different type of leadership.  Unfortunately, many leaders have one leadership style they apply to each of their direct reports and expect their direct reports to excel.

Everyone has different behavior styles and workplace motivations.  Some direct reports respond best with a firm message, others with a gentle nudging, others with lengthly conversations.  Some people are motivated by recognition, others by money, others by altruism.  The best leaders take time to understand their direct reports’ differences and tailor their leadership approaches to each person.
 
Empower yourself to understand your direct reports’ behavioral styles and motivations, apply unique leadership approaches, and you’ll be a more successful leader.